Home | About


Professionals and Organizations Professionals and Organizations
The term "conservation" in "conservation organizations" is a broad one. The organizations listed by the Mississippi State Conservation Center run the gamut from local offices of federal agencies to private land trusts to for-profit businesses. They all have in common programs that are designed, in part or in whole, to help private landowners maintain their property. Activities are as diverse as helping to protect land, manage land, diversify operations, transition operations, restore ecosystems, and improve profitability.

Conservation professionals encompass an even broader range of expertise. These are people who may be employed by conservation organizations, or they may be business people or self-employed. They may have legal, wildlife, wetland, or land management expertise.

Organizations and professionals operating in Mississippi who wish to be listed here can click Add me to the Directory to request to be listed.

Learn more about Land Conservation Learn more about Land Conservation


By:
Read More »


By:
Mississippi Bird Monitoring and Evaluation Plan Final Report, 2006–2010 Read More »


By:

Conservation buffers such as filter strips, riparian buffers, grassed waterways, and field borders are especially applicable to southeastern landscapes and have multiple environmental benefits while serving to significantly improve wildlife habitats.

Read More »


By:

Summary Findings

  • The Habitat Buffers for Upland Birds practice (CP33) is the first Federal conservation practice to target species-specific population recovery goals of a national wildlife conservation initiative (the Northern Bobwhite Conservation Initiative).
  • Over 14 states, breeding bobwhite densities were 70 to 75 percent greater around CP33 buffered fields than around unbuffered crop fields.
  • Fall bobwhite covey densities were 50 to 110 percent greater around CP33 fields than around unbuffered crop fields, and this positive response to CP33 increased each subsequent year of the study.
  • Several upland songbirds (e.g., dickcissel, field sparrow) responded strongly to CP33 in the landscape.
  • Area-sensitive grassland birds (e.g.,grasshopper sparrow) exhibited little response to CP33 buffers.
  • These findings illustrate the wildlife value of field borders and other buffer practices implemented through EQIP, WHIP, and other conservation programs.
Read More »


By:

ABSTRACT.—Grassland bird populations are sharply declining in North America. Changes in agricultural practices during the past 50 years have been suggested as one of the major causes of this decline. Field-border conservation practices encouraged by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Conservation Buffer Initiative meet many of the needs of sustainable agriculture and offer excellent opportunities to enhance local grassland  bird populations within intensive agricultural production systems. Despite the abundant information on avian use of, and reproductive success in, strip habitats during the breeding season, few studies have examined the  potential value of field borders for wintering birds. We planted 89.0 km of field borders (6.1 m wide) along  agricultural field edges on one-half of each of three row crop and forage production farms in northeastern  Mississippi. We sampled bird communities along these field edges during February–March 2002 and 2003 using  line-transect distance sampling and strip transects to estimate density and community structure, respectively. We used Program DISTANCE to estimate densities of Song (Melospiza melodia), Savannah (Passerculus sandwichensis), and other sparrows along bordered and non-bordered transects while controlling for adjacent plant  community. Greater densities of several sparrow species were observed along most bordered transects. However, effects of field borders differed by species and adjacent plant community types. Diversity, species richness, and relative conservation value (a weighted index derived by multiplying species-specific abundances by their respective Partners in Flight conservation priority scores) were similar between bordered and non-bordered edges.  Field borders are practical conservation tools that can be used to accrue multiple environmental benefits and  enhance wintering farmland bird populations. Provision of wintering habitat at southern latitudes may influence  population trajectories of short-distance migrants of regional conservation concern.

Read More »


By:

The conservation provisions of the Farm Bill can produce more consistent positive wildlife habitat benefits when policy (program statutes, rules, practices, and practice standards) is developed in the context of explicit goals identified as part of large-scale conservation initiatives.

Read More »


By:

The conservation objective in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley is to provide forested habitat capable of supporting sustainable populations of all forest dependent wildlife species. This report provides recommendations to improve and enhance management activities directed at providing habitat for priority wildlife species.

Read More »


By:
For a landscape supporting healthy native bird populations across the LMVJV Read More »


By:
The National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative (NBCI) is the unified range-wide strategy of 25 state wildlife agencies, with numerous conservation group and research institution partners, to achieve widespread restoration of native grassland habitats and huntable populations of wild quail. Read More »


By:
Read More »


By:
Read More »


By:
Fact Sheet. Read More »


By:
Report that shows farmers have significantly reduced the loss of sediment and nutrients from farm fields through voluntary conservation work in the lower Mississippi River basin. Read More »


By:
Working ranches are often promoted as means of private rangeland conservation because they can safeguard ecosystem services, protect open space, and maintain traditional ranching culture. To understand the potential for generating broad social benefits from what have come to be called "working landscapes", one must consider the synergies of people, environment, and institutions needed to accomplish conservation, as well as complicating factors of scale and uncertainty. Focusing on the problem as it has unfolded in the western United States, we review the state of knowledge about the extent of ranchland conversion; reasons why maintaining working ranches may benefit conservation; and the challenges and opportunities of rancher demographics, attitudes, values, and propensities for innovation. Based on this review, we explore whether the supply of traditional, full-time ranch owners is likely to be sufficient to meet conservation demand, and conclude that although demographic trends seem to suggest that it is not, there exist alternative enterprises and ownership forms that could achieve the goals of ranch conservation. We offer suggestions on how potential shortfalls might be addressed. Read More »


By:
Private land conservation initiatives are a critical component of any state-level quality of life agenda. Although concerns over sprawl, including the loss of prime agricultural lands and significant green space, continue to be one of the underlying rallying cries in support of state-level smart growth initiatives, the fact remains that with few exceptions, conservation of privately-owned working lands has not received significant attention in smart growth literature or conferences. Yet, land conservation and growth management are inextricably intertwined and policy initiatives must work in concert to be effective. Read More »


This guide offers a path for local landowners to earn additional income while helping diminish adverse effects of global climate change through implementation of carbon sequestration and other stackable incentives. This document is a tool to help landowners make the decision whether or not to enroll their land in carbon sequestration. It discusses background information on carbon sequestration and global climate change; current methods of sequestration, including forestry, conservation planting, methane capture and others; and steps a land owner must take, including contracts, verification, and implementation, once they have made the decision to enroll their lands in a sequestration project.

Read More »


By:
For those of you who don’t know, TDR stands for Transferable Development Rights. Simply put, these are typically programs that are designed by local government to allow for the free market transfer of subdivision or development rights from a rural (agricultural and/or conservation) zone to a designated development zone within a jurisdiction.  These rights are purchased by a land developer at market value from a landowner in a rural area where there are often more development rights than are allowed to be used by zoning in that area.  Referred to as a “Sending” zone, the rights are then legally separated from the farm or rural property in exchange for a land preservation easement.  The rights can be held for investment or transferred into a “Receiving” zone, which is a designated growth area for real estate development.  In these Receiving zones additional density is allowed to be added when the rights are acquired from the rural Sending zones.

Equally as important it can be a very effective tool for preserving farmland, conservation areas and even historic places. 
While not for every community, there are many that are ripe for such programs.  So, what are the common features and attributes of the most successful programs around the nation? Read More »


By:
The bundle of rights theory maintains that ownership of a parcel of real estate may embrace a great many rights, such as the right to its occupancy and use; the right to sell it in whole or in part; the right to bequeath; the right to transfer by contract for specified periods of time, the benefits to be derived by occupancy and use of the real estate. Read More »


By: , , ,
“In wildness is the preservation of the world.” Quoted from an essay by Thoreau lamenting the way in which modern urban life has made natural resources into commodities and isolated people from the natural processes on which their lives depended. Move forward to 2006, “open space” or “green space” has nearly replaced ‘wilderness’ in our vocabulary with the rise in the development of the rural landscape. The US population is now over 300 million and more and more people are sprawling out from the urban areas into the country. This push outward is having a measurable effect on our open spaces. Farmland near cities has seen its value inflated by demand for conversion to non-farm uses. People are often willing to pay more than agricultural value in order to live in primarily rural areas. For example, in Iowa there are now more non-farmers living in rural areas than there are farmers. Read More »


By:

Conservation easements have been utilized as a primary tool for land protection in the United States for approximately thirty years. The movement started in the Northeastern part of the country and has slowly, but steadily, made its way to the Southeast; the Mississippi Alluvial Valley to be specific. In the past 10 years, Ducks Unlimited, Inc. has had the opportunity to protect approximately 130,000 acres of forest, farm and recreational land under its Conservation Easement Program.

Article Published in Tree Talk (Official Publication of the Mississippi Forestry Association, Inc.) Fall 2001

Read More »


By:
Renowned for its hunting, Tara Wildlife also offers birding, hiking and a well-equipped conference and recreation facility. Read More »


By:

A landowner recently asked us: "What is the best way to ensure that the land I donate is not sold?" We put the question to the land trust community and it generated quite a bit of activity on the land trust listserv. They provided a spectrum of ideas which range from the pragmatic to the philosophical. We have summarized and compiled their responses here and hope it will provide some good ideas and sound advice for landowners, as well as continuing this conversation among the land trust community. 

Read More »


By:
A Prescribed Fire Association is a group of landowners and other concerned citizens that form a partnership to conduct prescribed burns. Prescribed burning is the key land management tool used to restore and maintain native plant communities to their former diversity and productivity for livestock production and wildlife habitat. Native prairies, shrublands, and forests supply the majority of livestock forage and much of the wildlife habitat in the U.S. Without fire, many native plant communities become dysfunctional and unproductive. Research has clearly shown that there is no substitute for fire. 

Many forest and grassland ecosystems are fire dependent and not burning is poor land management.  Why do not more people use prescribed fire to manage their land? First, fire was not part of the European culture that settled in post-Columbian America. Fire exclusion and fire suppression has been engrained in our society for years and popularized by the very successful Smokey the Bear ad campaign. The result has been a rapid decline in the quality of our natural resources, along with costing taxpayers millions of dollars each year to fight wildfires and the many other negative consequences of fuel build up. This article has been adapted from Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Association. Read More »


By:
One tool for estate planners is the conservation easement, by which a landowner voluntarily restricts his or her land from being developed, restricts the amount of development or protects existing features, like a building facade with historic value.
Read More »


By:
For decades, conservation easements have protected open space values such as wildlife habitat, ecological diversity, recreational access and aesthetics. Working forest landscapes present an opportunity to protect not only these open space values, but also the economic and community benefits that arise from a forest’s production of goods and services. Read More »


By:
Many rural communities are facing challenges, including rapid growth at metropolitan edges, declining rural populations, and loss of working lands. This report focuses on smart growth strategies that can help guide growth in rural areas while protecting natural and working lands and preserving the rural character of existing communities. These strategies are based around three central goals: 1) support the rural landscape by creating an economic climate that enhances the viability of working lands and conserves natural lands; 2) help existing places to thrive by taking care of assets and investments such as downtowns, Main Streets, existing infrastructure, and places that the community values; and 3) create great new places by building vibrant, enduring neighborhoods and communities that people, especially young people, don’t want to leave. Read More »


By: , ,
The preservation of land for working rural landscapes, wildlife habitat, urban parks, recreational trails, and protecting water supplies and floodplains is emerging as an integral component of smart growth programs. Both the general public and non-profit organizations have been willing to spend billions of dollars on land preservation because of a perception that traditional land use planning and regulation are not successfully accommodating growth or protecting valuable natural resources. The literature on smart growth has largely overlooked the potential of land preservation to curb sprawl and to foster livable communities. On the other hand, the literature on land preservation has focused on the mechanics of conservation easements and land purchases rather than on how land preservation can fit in the comprehensive planning process to achieve community smart growth goals. More research needs to be done on the strategic use of land preservation in shaping and directing growth as part of a comprehensive planning effort. 
Read More »


By:
Clearly, the motivation for a land conservation transaction is often the desire of the landowner to safeguard the property. However, this objective must be balanced with the need to maximize the return to the landowner. The general perception is that the highest return will be realized from a sale to a developer. 
 
Read More »


By:

Almost everyone in forestry has heard of land trusts since they have become a common fixture especially in areas that are rapidly urbanizing. But the unfortunate perception of many forest and farm owners is that land trusts are not to be trusted because their real purpose is to steal private property and pull lands out of production. Nothing could be further from the truth, but critics rely on false ‘private property’ threats to turn land owners away from land trusts even before owners understand how they work. A forest owner who knows how land trusts operate is more inclined to protect lands from development than owners who know little about this highly innovated to protect forest lands from development.

Read More »


By:

It may come as a shock, but there is a sort of symbiotic relationship at work between property owners with conservation easements and the IRS. Hard to believe, I know. We understand that the IRS gives tax breaks for those who protect their property from certain development and use. In special circumstances, these landowners can find tax breaks that many others will not reach, similar to the nectar only available to the unique and capable hummingbirds.

The Landowner, Conservation Easements & the 2010 Roth Conversion. At the beginning of 2010, the $100,000 MAGI (Modified Adjusted Gross Income) limit on Roth IRA conversions was lifted. Individuals that were not able to convert an IRA to a Roth in previous years may now be eligible, and the subject is getting quite a bit of news.

Read More »


Land trusts are non-profit organizations directly involved in the permanent protection of land and its resources for the public benefit. A trust may operate on a local, state, regional, or national level. Read More »


By:
Land trusts across the country are preserving agricultural lands to support local food systems.  Read More »

Professionals and Organizations River Conservation Programs
The state of Mississippi is 340 miles long, and the winding, sinuous Mississippi River runs along the full length of its western border. The Delta region of Mississippi is most profoundly influenced by the river, but river-associated transportation, tourism, soils, and backwater flooding affect much of the state indirectly.

Old Man River is not what it once was, having been confined, over the past hundred years or so by 1600 miles worth of levees meant to control its flooding. However, in the aftermath of recent flood events and increasing recognition of the value of ecosystem services provided by a functioning river system, recent studies and some organizations have argued for ecological restoration in the form of levee setbacks and large-scale, controlled diversions of water and sediment from the Mississippi River to reconnect it to the delta. There is also a movement to promote natural heritage tourism throughout the lower Mississippi region.

Currently, there are at least eight initiatives or coalitions that focus on various aspects of conserving or promoting the Mississippi River, and by extension parts of Mississippi State. These initiatives have implications for the citizens and private landowners of Mississippi, some through direct availability of resources and others by shaping the broad nature of development and state priorities in years to come.

  • Lower Mississippi River Conservation Committee
  • The Lower Mississippi River Aquatic Resource Management Plan
  • Lower Mississippi River Conservation Initiative
  • Mississippi River Commission
  • NRCS Mississippi River Basin Healthy Watersheds Initiative
  • Audubon Mississippi River Initiative
  • Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund
  • Lower Mississippi Valley Joint Venture

Learn more about River Conservation Learn more about River Conservation


By:
According to Tierra Resources, wetlands are our first line of defense against hurricanes and their protection and restoration are vital to both the economic and environmental sustainability of the Gulf Coast. Read More »


In November of 2009, Secretary Vilsack announced a commitment of $320 million over the next four years for a   Mississippi River Basin Healthy Watersheds Initiative to address water quality, wildlife habitat and natural resource conservation concerns in the Basin.   The Agency’s focus will bring badly needed resources to bear on the very serious water quality problems in the Basin.  Read More »


While not specific to Mississippi, the National Pollution Funds Center administers the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund, which may be a source of funding for personal damages and ecosystem restoration in Mississippi and other Gulf states in the wake of the BP Deepwater Horizon debacle. Discharges of oil into the aquatic environment can be extremely disruptive, causing both direct and indirect injury to living resources and their habitat, with subsequent loss of associated services (e.g., biological productivity and diversity, recreation, sediment trapping, and shoreline stabilization) and economic values. Read More »


Audubon Mississippi River Initiative

The National Audubon Society is advocating a new vision for the Mississippi River watershedas a connected natural system that deserves greater attention from the nation.

Audubon is advocating a major public investment in the Mississippi River system by Congress and the states to address the biggest challenges: the decline of many birds, other wildlife and their habitats; the loss of riverine and coastal wetlands; and inputs of excess nutrients, mainly from farms, that lead to the huge annual "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico.

The program has four goals:

1. Protect and enhance bird species drawn from the Audubon Watchlist and vulnerable common birds tied to five target habitats: Bottomland Forest, Emergent Wetlands, Grasslands, Coastal Areas and Urban Areas.
2. Improve water quality, focusing on reduction of excess nutrients tied to the Gulf of Mexico dead zone.
3. Restore natural hydrology to sustain river functions and reduce loss of coastal wet­lands in Louisiana.
4. Coordinate actions at hemispheric, national, regional, and local scales.


The organization is taking action to restore and protect critical habitat for birds, other wildlife and people on more than 2 million acres in the Mississippi watershed. These Conservation Action Sites are near Audubon Centers and Field Offices with staff and capacity for on-the-ground work.




GreenTrees sucessfully completes planting over 4 million trees
GreenTrees. In addition to planting over 4 million trees with 6 million more to be planted in the next few years as part of the NS contract, C2I has done more to change policy than anyone in recent years. For example, in 2008 we got CP31, 23, 23A and 37 incentives changed. The increased incentives announced in this Notice for CP 31, CP23A, CP23 and CP37 (Continuous CRP) are:
A. A one-time Signing Incentive Payment of $100/Acre.
B. A Practice Incentive Payment totaling 40% of the FSA-authorized establishment (tree planting) costs.
C. An additional 20% increase in the per acre soil rental rate paid each year of the contract.


Lower Mississippi Valley Joint Venture

The Lower Mississippi Valley Joint Venture, or LMVJV, is a self-directed, non-regulatory private, state, federal conservation partnership that exists for the purpose of implementing the goals and objectives of national and international bird conservation plans within the Lower Mississippi Valley region.  It is one of about 24 joint ventures in the United States that has formed to help implement the North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA), passed in 1989 to reverse the continent-wide decline of waterfowl.  Like all the bird joint ventures, the LMVJV plays a key role in recommending projects for funding under the NAWCA standard and small grants programs.  


The LMVJV partnership is focused on the protection, restoration, and management of those species of North American avifauna and their habitats encompassed by the North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP); North American Land Bird Conservation Plan; United States Shorebird Conservation Plan (USSCP); North American Waterbird Conservation Plan (NAWCP); and Northern Bobwhite Conservation Initiative (NBCI). Collectively, these national and international plans are recognized as the North American Bird Conservation Initiative (NABCI).

Joint Venture planning, implementation, and evaluation are specific to Bird Conservation Regions (BCR's) as defined by the U.S. NABCI Committee. The LMVJV’s primary geographic focus is the two BCR's lying entirely or mostly within the LMVJV administrative boundary - the Mississippi Alluvial Valley and West Gulf Coastal Plain. However, Joint Venture planning, implementation, and evaluation extends in varying degrees to the limits of the Joint Venture's administrative boundary.  




Lower Mississippi River Conservation Committee

The Lower Mississippi River Conservation Committee (LMRCC) is a cooperative, nonprofit organization of state and federal agencies working to renew and effectively managie the natural resources of the Lower Mississippi River.

 

The LMRCC has three broad goals that will improve the Lower Mississippi River’s aquatic resources.  These goals are to:  

  1. raise public awareness of the River as an ecosystem (most people aren’t aware of the river’s natural resources)  
  2. implement sustainable land use changes on the floodplain by working with willing private landowners to reforest marginal agricultural lands, and  
  3. increase public interaction with the river by promoting consumptive (hunting and fishing) and non-consumptive (tourism, bird watching, camping, recreational boating, etc.) uses. 

Funding

 

Support for the LMRCC comes from a variety of sources including: 

  • Annual dues of member agencies 
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 4
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regions IV V and VII
  • U.S. Geological Survey
  • The Ohrstrom Foundation
  • TARA Foundation
  • Little River Foundation                         
  • National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
  • Private contributions


Both the Lower Mississippi River Aquatic Resource Management Plan and the Lower Mississippi River Conservation Initiative are projects of the LMRCC.




Landscape Conservation Cooperatives, or LCCs, are self-directed partnerships that link science with conservation actions to address climate change and other stressors within and across landscapes. They complement and build upon existing science and conservation efforts — such as fish habitat partnerships and migratory bird joint ventures — as well as water resources, land, and cultural partnerships. Read More »


The Mississippi River Conservation Initiative

The Mississippi River Conservation Initiative, or MRCI, is the implementation phase of the LMRCC’s Aquatic Resource Management Plan.


MRCI is comprised of three primary components: 

  1. Assessment of conservation needs and opportunities; 
  2. Project planning and design; and 
  3. Project implementation.  


Through this process the LMRCC, in partnership with a wide array of federal, state, local and non-governmental organizations, will implement projects to restore aquatic habitat, improve water quality and provide sustainable economic development.


MRCI was formally launched in November, 2001 with the first state planning meeting held in Jackson, Tennessee. Meetings were held for Missouri and Kentucky in 2002, in Arkansas and Mississippi in 2003, and in Louisiana in 2004. A total of 239 conservation and habitat restoration opportunities have been identified.  





The Mississippi River Commission (MRC) was established by an Act of Congress on June 28, 1879. Congress charged the MRC with the mission to develop plans to improve the condition of the Mississippi River, foster navigation, promote commerce, and prevent destructive floods—perhaps the most difficult and complex engineering problem ever undertaken by the federal government up to that take.



Read More »

Professionals and Organizations Mississippi Conservation News
land+conservation news in Mississippi Conservation Center
The following news articles are provided by the Google News service and do not reflect the views or imply an endorsement by the Mississippi Conservation Center and its affiliates. We cannot guarantee the relevance of the content of this page or any links that may be followed from the articles herein.
Google News

Mississippi To Submit Four Proposals For Spill Funding
Mississippi Public Broadcasting (blog)
Three of the projects Mississippi proposes are Gulf-wide, including two land conservation programs and a proposal to put dredged sediment to beneficial use. The fourth project would create a Mississippi Sound estuary program. "These are strong themes, ...

and more »



Potlatch Corporation Reports Third Quarter 2014 Results and Signs Purchase ...
NASDAQ
SPOKANE, Wash., Oct. 20, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Potlatch Corporation(Nasdaq:PCH) announced today its third quarter 2014 results and that it has signed a purchase agreement to acquire 201,000 acres of timberlands in Alabama and Mississippi from ...

and more »



CapeCod.com News

Wampanoags Start New Land Trust
CapeCod.com News
Leslie Jonas, board member of the Native Land Conservancy, said, “We are pleased to host this round table discussion with Ms. Kennedy and explore ways our organizations can work together to protect lands which have longstanding cultural and historical ...




Truck limits divide county
Winona Post
It may be a false choice, but tourism versus industry has been a common matchup in public policy debates for decades in the beautiful and industrious Mississippi River Valley. Last week, business owners and ... Last Wednesday, the Buffalo County Land ...




WQAD.com

River conference looks for pollution solutions
WQAD.com
These old school techniques are even more important now. As farmers prevent soil erosion on their own land, they're also slowing pollution into the Mississippi River. It's saving the river with land conservation. That's a challenge becoming even more ...




Nonprofit group eyes Native American lands
Capecodonline
The Native Land Conservancy is a nonprofit organization that, like other land trusts such as the Barnstable Land Trust or the Orleans Conservation Trust, will buy or accept donations of land to save it from development. Unlike others on the Cape ...




Jackson Clarion Ledger

Plans for Pearl River land re-routed
Jackson Clarion Ledger
Due to its location, the property was being considered earlier this year as a candidate for an urban NWR. But when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service opted not to move forward, MDOT turned to the nonprofit Wildlife Mississippi to oversee the land and ...




Daily Record

Creating a haven for quail on a Jersey farm
Daily Record
Haines and Williams have been working with New Jersey Audubon, the Tall Timbers Research and Land Conservancy in Florida, the University of Delaware, and other wildlife biologists who hope to see the work at Chatsworth duplicated in many other places ...




AmmoLand.com

Alabama and Mississippi Protect the Right to Hunt and Fish – Vote YES!
AmmoLand.com
CSF recognizes the significant, positive economic impact of sportsmen and women who directly support conservation, as well as the right to continue a consumptive, yet responsible use of fish and wildlife resources. Unfortunately today, anti-hunting ...

and more »



In Wisconsin, mines credited for rising, dropping property values
La Crosse Tribune
For Curran, the sale of land has created new opportunities. Her family moved into a new home in September ... The company created a bat habitat in an abandoned rail tunnel and participated in a habitat conservation plan for the endangered Karner blue ...


Google News
Professionals and Organizations Land Conservation Articles
Introductory & Technical Articles on land conservation
Professionals and OrganizationsFor those of you new to land conservation, we have articles to introduce you to the basic concepts. These articles will help you understand the issues and strategies associated with charitable donations of land and conservation easements.

By: Wade Martin and Sally Ramirez
Clearly, the motivation for a land conservation transaction is often the desire of the landowner to safeguard the property. However, this objective must be balanced with the need to maximize the return to the landowner. The general perception is that the highest return will be realized from a sale to a developer. 
 
Read More »


By: Mark W. Brunson and Lynn Huntsinger
Working ranches are often promoted as means of private rangeland conservation because they can safeguard ecosystem services, protect open space, and maintain traditional ranching culture. To understand the potential for generating broad social benefits from what have come to be called "working landscapes", one must consider the synergies of people, environment, and institutions needed to accomplish conservation, as well as complicating factors of scale and uncertainty. Focusing on the problem as it has unfolded in the western United States, we review the state of knowledge about the extent of ranchland conversion; reasons why maintaining working ranches may benefit conservation; and the challenges and opportunities of rancher demographics, attitudes, values, and propensities for innovation. Based on this review, we explore whether the supply of traditional, full-time ranch owners is likely to be sufficient to meet conservation demand, and conclude that although demographic trends seem to suggest that it is not, there exist alternative enterprises and ownership forms that could achieve the goals of ranch conservation. We offer suggestions on how potential shortfalls might be addressed. Read More »


By: Patricia E. Salkin
Private land conservation initiatives are a critical component of any state-level quality of life agenda. Although concerns over sprawl, including the loss of prime agricultural lands and significant green space, continue to be one of the underlying rallying cries in support of state-level smart growth initiatives, the fact remains that with few exceptions, conservation of privately-owned working lands has not received significant attention in smart growth literature or conferences. Yet, land conservation and growth management are inextricably intertwined and policy initiatives must work in concert to be effective. Read More »

Select a Region