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California is a state blessed with rugged mountains, dramatic coastlines, some of the world’s richest soils, a climate perfect for agriculture - and not very much water. As a matter of course, Californians, particularly those in the Central Valley and southern half of the state, do not expect rain for at least half of each year.

Fruit of the Vine . . . and the Rivers
Nevertheless the Golden State produces more than half of the nation’s fruits, nuts and vegetables including almost all of the country’s almonds, apricots, dates, figs, kiwi, nectarines, olives, pistachios, prunes, and walnuts. California is also the nation's number one dairy state, and the value of its output far exceeds that of second-place Texas, with $27.3 billion worth of output in 2008 (17% of US agricultural output). As the world’s fifth largest producer of agricultural commodities, California farm products were shipped to 194 individual countries worldwide in 2008. Since 2011, agricultural prices and income are up significantly, and production has risen steadily since 2000.

In such an arid state, how is this amazing production of thirsty crops possible? In the gently ironic words of Marc Reisner, author of Cadillac Desert:

“In the East, to ‘waste’ water is to consume it needlessly or excessively. In the West, to waste water is not to consume it - to let it flow unimpeded and undiverted down rivers.”

Massive Dams, Massive Water Use, Massive Overdraw
total withdrawals And indeed, Californians have let precious little of their water go to waste. California’s construction in the first half of the 20th century of two gargantuan dam systems - the federal Bureau of Reclamation’s Central Valley Project and the State Water Project - has allowed it to wrest 15-25 billion gallons of water per day from its rivers and underground aquifers. The dams send water from the wet northern counties and Sierran rivers fed by snowpack to the state’s hothouse of agricultural production, the Central Valley.

Likewise, Californians’ wells continue to draw water from underground aquifers unmonitored and unregulated, despite recent NASA satellite data indicating that pumping for irrigation is occurring at rates that are “not sustainable if current trends continue.” Groundwater overdraw leads to declining water tables, water shortages, decreased crop sizes and land subsidence. Land subsidence in the San Franciso Bay Delta then threatens the levee system that is the linchpin of California’s water works.

The Clouds on the Horizon
Over time, California’s success in avoiding water “waste” has contributed to a range of problems exacerbated by more insidious threats, such as climate change and its associated ills. There is naked conflict between urban and agricultural water users and ecosystem advocates who are concerned about leaving enough water in rivers to support salmon and other aquatic species.

Through a 1922 agreement among seven Southwestern states, Colorado River water dispensed via the Hoover dam supplies southern CA with a minimum of 4.4 million acre-feet of water per year. However, California has been in the habit of using “surplus” (unused) Colorado River water until the supply became tighter during recent drought periods. To make matters worse, recent tree ring studies of the region have shown that the long-term average flow of the Colorado River is lower than originally thought, and California can no longer count on the Colorado’s surplus.

Modeling of climate change effects in this temperate state also anticipates a decreased Sierran snowpack, which acts as California’s “water bank” throughout the dry season. Sea level rise threatens to inundate and destroy countless thousands of acres of marsh and coastal habitats while also sending saltwater further into the San Francisco Bay Delta, making the water useless for irrigation.

In the course of dealing with these many challenges, Californians have worked hard, disagreed bitterly, and collaborated reluctantly with state and federal governments to address these issues in myriad ways. The future will be challenging, but many efforts to conserve and rationally manage California’s water are ongoing and initiated everyday.

total withdrawals  total withdrawals
Water Resources Farm Water Success Stories
Innovative growers and water managers throughout California are finding sustainable ways to manage water, providing benefits both on and off the farm. Here is an overview of the California Farm Water Success Stories interviews.
Learn more about Water Conservation Learn more about Water Conservation


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Provides an overview on how the region can help meet growing demands for water with voluntary market-based sales and leases of water rights.

The report is a product of a year-long project in partnership with the Western States Water Council (WSWC), a group of top water administrators in the Western states. The Western Governors’ Association and WSWC convened three stakeholder workshops with more than 100 participants from July to December of 2011. The meetings drew state administrators, environmental organizations, farmers, academics, and water resource professionals from across the West, providing diverse perspectives on water transfers

Read More »


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Policy Resolution 2014-04: States have jurisdiction over water resource allocation decisions and are responsible for how to balance state water resource needs within Clean Water Act objectives. New regulations, rulemaking, and guidance should recognize this state authority.

 

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Policy Resolution 2014-03: As the preeminent authority on water management within their boundaries, states have the right to develop, use, control and distribute the surface water and groundwater located within their boundaries, subject to international treaties and interstate agreements and judicial decrees. Infrastructure investments are essential to our nation’s continued economic prosperity and environmental protection. Western Governors believe solutions to water resource challenges require an integrated approach within states and with federal, tribal and local partners.

Read More »


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Just as snow gives the West water, snow surveys give the West’s water users the knowledge needed for successful conservation. Major sectors of the region’s economy—agriculture, industry, recreation, and government—base their water management plans on information from the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Snow Survey and Supply Forecasting Program. 
 
Snowpack and climate data collected by NRCS and key Federal, State, Tribal, and private partners are used to produce water supply forecasts and drought risk assessments—critical tools in the increasingly challenging effort to balance environmental considerations with rapid population growth, agricultural and energy demands, and climate variability.

Read More »


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Water is a scarce and contentious resource in California. Its allocation frequently breeds conflicts over endangered species, land use, and public health. Unfortunately, the state’s water laws and bureaucracies often encourage fighting between competing water users. Water markets offer a way to resolve such conflicts without harming the environment or infringing on the rights of others. As the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery, and Storage Project demonstrates, water markets also motivate entrepreneurs to develop new water sources and deliver the scarce resource to the places that need it most.

Read More »


Gov. Brown directed the California Natural Resource Agency, California Environmental Protection Agency, and the California Department of Food and Agriculture to put together a multi-agency working group and identify key actions for the next one to five years that addresses urgent needs and provides the foundation for sustainable management of California's water resources.

 

Read More »


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Water quality improvement, wildlife habitat and stream bank stabilization. Read More »


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"One of the foundational principles of the U.S. Forest Service is water." This observation was made in reference to the impact of the Clean Water Act on the importance to watershed management within the national forests. This insight is now a matter of heightened concern as a shifting climate alters the levels of precipitation across the country.

Read More »


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A federal court held last month that the Environmental Protection Agency cannot regulate storm water flow in setting a total maximum daily load for impaired waters under the Clean Water Act. The court found that EPA can only issue TMDLs for actual pollutants.

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The Center for Irrigation Technology (CIT) is an independent testing laboratory, applied research facility, and educational resource center based at California State University, Fresno Read More »


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A rain barrel is an effective small-scale conservation practice that collects and stores rooftop runoff for future use to water lawns and gardens. It is estimated that during summer months, nearly 40% of household water is used for lawn and garden watering. Using a rain barrel may save the average homeowner up to 1,300 gallons of water during peak summer months. Read More »


The University of California Drought Management Website contains useful information on the available stratgeis for maximizing irrigation water efficiency. 


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California’s water wars are legendary, the stuff of books and the Hollywood drama, Chinatown, and they’ve been fought largely in agricultural ditches and the courts up until the creation of CALFED in 1994. Read More »


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A new study by the Pacific Institute shows that agriculturalists employing new steps to significantly increase the efficiency of water use in California fields will result in a strong and healthy California agricultural sector that can flourish despite diminishing water supply. Read More »


Save water by implementing these tips to reduce losses of water and energy resources from your swimming pool. Read More »


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Irrigation Water Management (IWM) is applying water according to crop needs in an amount that can be stored in the plant root zone of the soil. Read More »


In 2005-06, a long-range strategic visioning process was begun to take the state of California beyond the 1994-2024 time frame of the Bay-Delta Accord decision.  This long-range process resulted in the “Delta Vision Strategic Plan” of 2008. Read More »


Conducting a water audit can help you save money by reducing your home water bill (and sewer bill if you are connected to a public sewer system).  Conducting a water audit will make you aware of how you use your water and help to identify ways you can minimize water use by implementing certain conservation measures.  It is possible to cut your water usage by as much as 30 percent by implementing simple conservation measures and without drastically modifying
your lifestyle.

Read More »


This factsheet gives specific guidelines for amounts, types and frequency of fish to be eaten for safeguarding health. Read More »



Methylmercury is a form of mercury that is found in most freshwater and saltwater fish. In some lakes, rivers, and coastal waters in California, methylmercury has been found in some types of fish at concentrations that may be harmful to human health. The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) has issued health advisories to fishers and their families giving recommendations on how much of the affected fish in these areas can be safely eaten. In these advisories, women of childbearing age and children are encouraged to be especially careful about following the advice because of the greater sensitivity of fetuses and children to methylmercury. 

Fish are nutritious and should be a part of a healthy, balanced diet. As with many other kinds of food, however, it is prudent to consume fish in moderation. OEHHA provides advice to the public so that people can continue to eat fish without putting their health at risk.
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The Effects of Wetland Restoration on the Production and Bioaccumulation of Methylmercury in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California
Mercury (Hg) contamination and, particularly, the bioaccumulation of toxic methylmercury (MeHg) in food webs is one of the primary water quality issues in the San Francisco Bay-Delta watershed of California. This is the result, in large part, of the Gold Rush era legacy of extensive Hg use in Sierra Nevada gold mining, as well as the now-abandoned Hg mines in the California coast ranges that supplied this Hg. It is clear that both regions remain major sources of ongoing Hg contamination, both locally and downstream (Slotton et al. 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, Suchanek et al. 1997, Foe and Croyle 1998, Domagalski 1998, Roth et al. 2000). During the past 150 years, significant amounts of Hg, coming from mining operations on both sides of the state, have been deposited in Bay-Delta sediments. The extensive Sacramento- San Joaquin Delta levee system that originated in the 1860’s effectively isolated and converted ("reclaimed") wetlands for the production of agricultural crops and other uses and, in so doing, dramatically altered the natural functioning of these wetlands. Many levees were likely constructed at locations which already contained significant Hg deposits, and some of these historic Hg-laden diked wetlands have long been isolated from normal tidal inundation.


The Agricultural Regulatory Program of the State Water Resources Control Board regulates discharges from irrigated agricultural lands to protect surface water and groundwater. In 2004, the Water Board issued a general conditional waiver of waste discharge requirements that applies to owners and operators of irrigated land used for commercial crop production from which there may be a discharge of waste (irrigation or stormwater runoff or discharge to groundwater) that could affect the quality of waters of the State. 
 
Read More »


The State Water Resources Control Board has set up the "GeoTracker" web portal to serve data directly from monitoring wells, particularly those required at cleanup sites, to businesses and individuals throughout California.   Read More »


The original PRINCIPLES FOR AGREEMENT ON BAY-DELTA STANDARDS BETWEEN THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, which has guided the development of CALFED and its ecosystem restoration programs since it was signed in 1994 - up until the creation of the Delta Stewardship Council in 2010. Read More »


A factsheet all about nitrate pollution from agriculture and how to safeguard groundwater quality.


Agriculture’s use of inorganic fertilizer and animal manure is the most dominant
and widespread nitrate source in the Southwest, although urban areas, primarily unsewered areas, can also contribute significant nitrate to groundwater. The major regions with high groundwater nitrate pollution are therefore not surprisingly the major agricultural regions: Imperial, Central, Salinas, and other coastal valleys in California; the Snake River Plain in Idaho; the Wasatch Front in north- central Utah; the Rio Grande Valley
in New Mexico; and the Gila and Salt River valleys in Central Arizona.
Read More »


This brief factsheet from the Community Water Center provides tips to private well owners on how to ensure the health of their drinking water.  


If you are served by your own private well, then you are solely responsible for the quality of that water. There are no requirements or regulations regarding testing, quality, or reporting of private wells under the state and federal Safe Drinking Water Acts. However, most county ordinances set basic construction permit requirements before a well can be drilled, and some require testing of private wells before a title can change hands on a residential property. Overall, there is virtually no oversight of private wells in California. All maintenance and repairs are the responsibility of the landowner, and to get water quality information you will need to do your own water testing.

Read More »



The San Joaquin Valley is the center of California’s growing drinking water crisis. Five of its eight counties – Fresno, Madera, Merced, Kern, Kings, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, and Tulare – have some of the highest rates of water contamination per person in the state.1 Contaminated drinking water causes many adverse human health effects, including gastrointestinal illnesses, nervous or reproductive system impacts, and chronic diseases such as cancer.

This is the first of a series of reports from the Community Water Center that examine the prevalence of common drinking water contaminants in the San Joaquin Valley and the rates of related health indicators as outlined in public health literature.

The research does show two things, however: the San Joaquin Valley has high rates of nitrate contamination from agriculture and large animal facilities, and San Joaquin Valley residents face many health problems at rates much higher than elsewhere in the state. We believe that these two facts alone should be enough to compel us – as water providers, as government regulators, as residents in the San Joaquin Valley, and as a society – to ensure that our drinking water sources are protected to the utmost of our ability and to prioritize reducing the number of people drinking contaminated water. Safe, clean water is a human right, not a privilege. Read More »


Precise guidelines about how to implement retention irrigation systems.

Retention/irrigation refers to the capture of stormwater runoff in a holding pond and subsequent use of the captured volume for irrigation of landscape of natural pervious areas. This technology is very effective as a stormwater quality practice in that, for the captured water quality volume, it provides virtually no discharge to receiving waters and high stormwater constituent removal efficiencies. This technology mimics natural undeveloped watershed conditions wherein the vast majority of the rainfall volume during smaller rainfall events is infiltrated through the soil profile. Their main advantage over other infiltration technologies is the use of an irrigation system to spread the runoff over a larger area for infiltration. This allows them to be used in areas with low permeability soils.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.
 
Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
Read More »


Report authors: University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee of Experts on Dairy Manure Management

There are approximately 1.7 million lactating dairy cows in California. Sale of milk from these cows is estimated at $4.6 billion of the state’s $30 billion agricultural market. Nearly 73% of the cows are located in the San Joaquin Valley, which consists of San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Merced, Madera, Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Kern counties. The Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board submitted a list of questions to Vice President Gomes requesting specific information related to dairy manure. The answers to these questions are the basis for this lengthy report.

The report covers the following topics in depth, relative to manure management:

  • nitrogen (N) excretion
  • distribution of manure around dairies
  • atmospheric N from liquid manure
  • developing N application rate guidelines
  • phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) in manure
  • salts in manure and salinity issues in land application
Read More »


Key scientific conclusions regarding the future status of the Bay-Delta ecosystem, water supply through the Delta, and levee stability.  Read More »


This brief but comprehensive list from UC Cooperative Extension Monterey County offers a checklist of irrigation practices, design and equipment, and scheduling to increase your water security. Read More »


The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is a regional, state and national treasure.  More than 515,000 people in dozens of communities call the Delta home. It is also home to more than 750 animal and plant species, some of them threatened or endangered. It supports California’s $27 billion agricultural industry with an average annual gross value of more than $500 million in corn, grain, hay, sugar beets, alfalfa, pasture, tomatoes, asparagus, safflower, a range of fruits and more. More than 1,800 agricultural users draw water from the Delta. Read More »


Water conservation begins at home. Taking a few, simple steps when washing your boat or vehicle (including automobiles, trucks, motorcycles, and trailers) can help to conserve water and protect the quality of nearby water bodies. Read More »


Find watering tips for your garden. Read More »


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A new study by researchers at Oklahoma State University’s Department of Plant and Soil Sciences may well improve the predictability of seasonal droughts and provide a better way for farmers to determine when drought conditions are likely to occur.

Read More »

Water Resources Best Management Practice Downloads
The following are a selection of BMPs culled from various national, regional, state and local sources. Each is available for download as a pdf.


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Just as snow gives the West water, snow surveys give the West’s water users the knowledge needed for successful conservation. Major sectors of the region’s economy—agriculture, industry, recreation, and government—base their water management plans on information from the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Snow Survey and Supply Forecasting Program. 
 
Snowpack and climate data collected by NRCS and key Federal, State, Tribal, and private partners are used to produce water supply forecasts and drought risk assessments—critical tools in the increasingly challenging effort to balance environmental considerations with rapid population growth, agricultural and energy demands, and climate variability.

Read More »


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 Vegetated drainage ditches can help clean up runoff water.

Read More »


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Cities and towns often use constructed wetlands to manage water. Many Iowa municipalities are faced with managing not only stormwater generated within their limits, but also water from agricultural sources originating outside their jurisdiction. Managing urban and agricultural runoff, and the pollutants associated with it, provides unique challenges that are often best met with constructed wetlands. In addition to their benefits as stormwater infrastructure, wetlands also offer value-added opportunities for community and ecosystem improvement. They can be attractive community assets for citizens to enjoy. This report provides an overview of how constructed wetlands function, their ecological benefits, regulations related to wetlands, how to build and manage wetlands, and where to look for funding for a constructed wetland.

Read More »


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Here, using publicly available information, the Marine Conservation Institute and Mission Blue present the first scientifically rigorous quantitative account of no-take marine reserves in the waters of US coastal states and territories.

All people depend on services and goods that living oceans provide, but human activities now threaten marine life and, hence, our lives. Marine biologists recommend creating strong marine protected areas (MPAs) to safeguard life within them and to benefit people outside them. Many coastal states and territories have established at least some protected areas, but this protection is often weak or temporary, with fewer benefits to people. In contrast, no-take marine reserves—MPAs free from fishing, mining and oil & gas development—are the gold standard. They allow places in the sea to recover biodiversity and abundance, and export marine life to surrounding and remote areas.

Our finding: Few states provide strong protection for marine ecosystems. There is much room for improvement.

The best-protected states and territories are Hawaii, California and the US Virgin Islands. Hawaii protects 22.94% of its state marine waters as no-take reserves; California 8.74% and USVI 5.69%. These states and territories deserve our appreciation and our business. A few protect very small amounts of their coastal waters, roughly 1% or less (Florida, Puerto Rico, Oregon, CNMI, Guam, Washington, North Carolina, Virginia and Maine). Fifteen coastal states, including Alaska, Mississippi, South Carolina, Delaware and Massachusetts, don’t yet strongly protect any of their marine waters. Citizens deserve to know which states are leaders and which aren’t doing enough to protect our beaches, coastal waters and seafood. Read More »


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Water quality improvement, wildlife habitat and stream bank stabilization. Read More »


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A practical guide to ways agricultural producers can profit from the growing environmental marketplace from American Farmland Trust, 2010. An in-depth 55-page handbook that introduces and surveys the types of environmental markets, how to get involved including evaluating financial returns and assessing risks, and what farmers and ranchers can do to encourage these markets.

Read More »


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Improved performance at competitive costs is promised by this 2002 EPA publication all about anaerobic digestion and biogas recovery for energy. Read More »


A lengthy document from EPA (2004), Managing Manure contains information pertinent to Large CAFOs in the Dairy Cows and Cattle other than Veal Calves and the Swine, Poultry, and Veal Calves subcategories of the final CAFO regulations. Read More »


Under the federal Clean Water Act (CWA) and California's pioneering Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act, the State and Regional Water Boards have regulatory responsibility for protecting the water quality of nearly 1.6 million acres of lakes, 1.3 million acres of bays and estuaries, 211,000 miles of rivers and streams, and about 1,100 miles of exquisite California coastline.

The Guide provides an overview of the Water Boards and the many opportunities that all Californians have to participate with the Water Boards in decisions and activities that affect the state’s water resources. While some of the public participation opportunities are formal, e.g., at a Water Board hearing, others are less formal, but just as important, e.g., a stakeholder process implemented by a Regional Board. Although the Guide doesn’t contain information about specific water quality decisions that are before the Boards, it will direct you where you can find that information. We look forward to updating this Guide periodically to assure its continuing usefulness to you, the public.

Read More »


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Nutrient Management is defined as the management of the 4R's of Nutrient Management:Right amount (rate), Right source, Right placement (method of application), Right timing of commercial fertilizers, manure, soil amendments, and organic by-products to agricultural landscapes as a source of plant nutrients while protecting local air, soil and water quality.
 
The corner stone for Nutrient Management is the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) 590 Nutrient Management Conservation Practice Standard. Contact John Davis via phone at 202-720-2308, or email j.russell.davis@wdc.usda.gov
 
In addition to the 590 Nutrient Management Standard, NRCS provides further guidance on the application of nutrient management via the National Nutrient Management Policy and National Instruction.
Read More »


A factsheet all about nitrate pollution from agriculture and how to safeguard groundwater quality.


Agriculture’s use of inorganic fertilizer and animal manure is the most dominant
and widespread nitrate source in the Southwest, although urban areas, primarily unsewered areas, can also contribute significant nitrate to groundwater. The major regions with high groundwater nitrate pollution are therefore not surprisingly the major agricultural regions: Imperial, Central, Salinas, and other coastal valleys in California; the Snake River Plain in Idaho; the Wasatch Front in north- central Utah; the Rio Grande Valley
in New Mexico; and the Gila and Salt River valleys in Central Arizona.
Read More »


This brief factsheet from the Community Water Center provides tips to private well owners on how to ensure the health of their drinking water.  


If you are served by your own private well, then you are solely responsible for the quality of that water. There are no requirements or regulations regarding testing, quality, or reporting of private wells under the state and federal Safe Drinking Water Acts. However, most county ordinances set basic construction permit requirements before a well can be drilled, and some require testing of private wells before a title can change hands on a residential property. Overall, there is virtually no oversight of private wells in California. All maintenance and repairs are the responsibility of the landowner, and to get water quality information you will need to do your own water testing.

Read More »



The San Joaquin Valley is the center of California’s growing drinking water crisis. Five of its eight counties – Fresno, Madera, Merced, Kern, Kings, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, and Tulare – have some of the highest rates of water contamination per person in the state.1 Contaminated drinking water causes many adverse human health effects, including gastrointestinal illnesses, nervous or reproductive system impacts, and chronic diseases such as cancer.

This is the first of a series of reports from the Community Water Center that examine the prevalence of common drinking water contaminants in the San Joaquin Valley and the rates of related health indicators as outlined in public health literature.

The research does show two things, however: the San Joaquin Valley has high rates of nitrate contamination from agriculture and large animal facilities, and San Joaquin Valley residents face many health problems at rates much higher than elsewhere in the state. We believe that these two facts alone should be enough to compel us – as water providers, as government regulators, as residents in the San Joaquin Valley, and as a society – to ensure that our drinking water sources are protected to the utmost of our ability and to prioritize reducing the number of people drinking contaminated water. Safe, clean water is a human right, not a privilege. Read More »


Precise guidelines about how to implement retention irrigation systems.

Retention/irrigation refers to the capture of stormwater runoff in a holding pond and subsequent use of the captured volume for irrigation of landscape of natural pervious areas. This technology is very effective as a stormwater quality practice in that, for the captured water quality volume, it provides virtually no discharge to receiving waters and high stormwater constituent removal efficiencies. This technology mimics natural undeveloped watershed conditions wherein the vast majority of the rainfall volume during smaller rainfall events is infiltrated through the soil profile. Their main advantage over other infiltration technologies is the use of an irrigation system to spread the runoff over a larger area for infiltration. This allows them to be used in areas with low permeability soils.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.
 
Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
Read More »


The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
Read More »


Report authors: University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee of Experts on Dairy Manure Management

There are approximately 1.7 million lactating dairy cows in California. Sale of milk from these cows is estimated at $4.6 billion of the state’s $30 billion agricultural market. Nearly 73% of the cows are located in the San Joaquin Valley, which consists of San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Merced, Madera, Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Kern counties. The Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board submitted a list of questions to Vice President Gomes requesting specific information related to dairy manure. The answers to these questions are the basis for this lengthy report.

The report covers the following topics in depth, relative to manure management:

  • nitrogen (N) excretion
  • distribution of manure around dairies
  • atmospheric N from liquid manure
  • developing N application rate guidelines
  • phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) in manure
  • salts in manure and salinity issues in land application
Read More »


This brief but comprehensive list from UC Cooperative Extension Monterey County offers a checklist of irrigation practices, design and equipment, and scheduling to increase your water security. Read More »

BMPs oriented more specifically toward invasive & native species, farming & agriculture, energy efficiency and wildlife habitat management are also available.

Water Resources Water Quality Issues in California
Water+Quality news in California Conservation Center
The following news articles are provided by the Google News service and do not reflect the views or imply an endorsement by the California Conservation Center and its affiliates. We cannot guarantee the relevance of the content of this page or any links that may be followed from the articles herein.
Google News

CBS Local

EPA says California's Delta water tunnel project could violate federal law
Sacramento Bee
In the EPA letter, the agency's regional administrator, Jared Blumenfeld, wrote: “While (the project) would improve the water quality for agricultural and municipal water agencies that receive water exported from the Delta, water quality could worsen ...
EPA Says Delta Water Tunnels Could Violate Federal Environmental Law, Harm ...CBS Local
California Plan For Water Tunnels Violates Environmental Rules, EPA SaysBusiness Insider
Feds say California's Delta twin tunnel project may violate clean water laws ...The Republic

all 64 news articles »



Quicker beach water-quality testing bill heads to governor; alerts expedited
San Diego Community Newspaper Group
Swimming, surfing or participating in other water activities in polluted water can result in stomach flu, skin rashes, pinkeye, respiratory infections, meningitis and hepatitis. The California Coastkeeper Alliance states that every year about one ...

and more »



Breitbart News

California Proposition 1 Water Bond is Bait & Switch
Breitbart News
The $7.5 billion California Proposition 1 Water Bond (Assembly Bill 1471, “Water Quality, Supply, and Infrastructure Improvement Act of 2014”) on the November ballot promises to provide more above ground water storage for the first time in 40 years in ...
The Era of Big Dams is Still Over (Even With the Water Bond)Natural Resources Defense Council (blog)

all 2 news articles »



water wars 4:24am ET
The Week Magazine
At least they don't have to do laundry: A Northern California nudist camp is facing off against rangers who say they are stealing water during the devastating drought that has hit the Golden State. On Thursday, rangers from the Midpeninsula Open Space ...




League of California Cities and California State Association of Counties ...
Sierra Sun Times
The vote occurred during the board's meeting in Los Angeles in conjunction with the organization's Annual Conference. The bond's provisions provide substantial benefits for California cities and ensure that all communities have safe and reliable water ...

and more »



Politico

California drought threatens sushi, too
Politico
California — and the Sacramento Valley in particular — is the nation's primary source for the high-quality short- and medium-grain rice used in sushi and is a major supplier of the rice for other countries, too. But the state's 2,500 rice growers ...

and more »



For California's future, vote yes on Proposition 1
U-T San Diego
But the reality is that there is nothing more important to the state's economy and quality of life than a safe and reliable supply of water. Without it, the California economy would collapse. Spending that can help prevent that collapse is hardly ...




Fresno Bee

California poised to restrict groundwater pumping
Fresno Bee
Among the opponents is the Northern California Water Association, a group that represents property owners, water agencies and farmers in the Sacramento Valley. The group's president and CEO, David Guy, said there are probably 50,000 landowners in the ...

and more »



CA water purification plant wins prestigious Project of the Year Award
WaterWorld
It is the largest facility of its kind in Northern California. The new plant uses three advanced technologies to purify water, which has already undergone two levels of quality wastewater treatment, sourced from the San José-Santa Clara Regional ...




California water bond leads among likely voters, new poll shows
LA Daily News
SACRAMENTO — A new Field Poll finds slightly more than half of likely voters approve of a $7.5 billion water bond on the November ballot. But the poll released Wednesday shows that Gov. Jerry Brown and other supporters have work to do promoting ...


Google News
Water Resources Conducting a Home Water Audit
What is a home water audit?
A home water audit is an assessment of how much water is used and how much water can be saved in the home. Conducting a water audit involves calculating water use and identifying simple ways for saving water in the home.

What are the benefits of conducting a water audit? Conducting a water audit can help you save money by reducing your home water bill (and sewer bill if you are connected to a public sewer system). Conducting a water audit will make you aware of how you use your water and help to identify ways you can minimize water use by implementing certain conservation measures. It is possible to cut your water usage by as much as 30 percent by implementing simple conservation measures and without drastically modifying your lifestyle.

How do I calculate water usage in my home?
It is important to realize that water use throughout the year often varies with the season. Most people use more water in the warmer months for gardening, washing cars, and other outdoor uses. If you conduct your water audit in the winter or fall, you should still consider the additional water you use in the summer months. The American Water Works Association (AWWA) estimates that the average indoor water use per person is 94 gallons of water per day; this does not take into account outdoor water use (watering lawns, washing cars).

Calculating water use from your water bill
If you obtain water from a community water system, you probably receive a water bill that tells you how much water you use. Many water utilities provide customers with bills that contain information regarding the amount of water consumed and average daily consumption during the billing period. If the average daily consumption is not provided, you can calculate it by dividing the total amount of water used by the number of days in the billing period. Determine whether your water is measured in cubic meters (m³), cubic feet (ft³), gallons (gal), or liters (L) and convert to gallons.

For converting into gallons, use the following conversion factors:
m³ x 264 = gal
ft³ x 7.48 = gal
L x 0.264 = gal

There are several conversion tools available on the Internet that can be used to make your calculations easier. www.onlineconversion.com/volume.htm or www.mathconnect.com/volume1.htm

Calculating water use with a meter
If your water bill does not provide water consumption data, then you can read your water meter to obtain this information. Water meters measure the total amount of water used in your home and are usually located at the property line or on the house. The meter may measure in cubic meters, cubic feet, gallons, or liters. To obtain your water use over the course of a 24-hour day, read your meter at the same time on two consecutive days. You may want to measure water use for several days and then calculate a daily average.

Estimating water use without a meter
If you do not have a water meter you can estimate your water use. It will be important to measure all water use, indoor and outdoor, to accurately estimate the quantity of water used. To determine how much you consume water in your home it is necessary to measure water flow from each fixture in your house:
  • To calculate flow for faucets (indoor and outdoor) and showerheads, turn faucet to the normal flow rate that you use, and hold a container under the tap for 10 seconds and measure the quantity of water in the container. Multiply the measured quantity of water by 6 to calculate the gallons per minutes (gpm).
  • To calculate flow for toilets, turn off the water supply to the toilet, mark the water line on the inside of the tank, flush, and then fill tank with water from tap. Measure the volume of water that is required to fill water back up to the water line mark on the tank and record this number. Turn water on to the toilet to resume normal use.
  • If your appliances or fixtures are relatively new, you may be able to obtain the flow rate from the manufacturer's specifications. Otherwise, use the following averages:
    • Washing machine - 41 gal per use
    • Dishwashing machine - 9 gal per use
Next, measure how many times per day or how many minutes each day you use each fixture or appliance. Multiply the water flow per fixture by the minutes per day the fixture is used. Multiply the flow average for each appliance by the number of times the appliance is used each week. Don't forget to include the amount of time you use outdoor faucets each day. The water audit spreadsheet is a useful tool to evaluate water use in the home.

How does my water useage rank?
The average citizen uses about 100 gallons of water per day. This includes indoor as well as outdoor water usage. To calculate the per person daily water usage rate, divide your daily water usage by the number of people in your home, and then look at the following chart to rate your water usage.

Gallons Per Person Per Day Rank Comments
< 80 gal/day Excellent Wow! You use water wisely.  Please share your conseravtion techniques with friends and neighbors
80-100 gal/day Good Good Job!  You use less water than the average citizen
101-120 gal/day Fair You use more water than the average citizen
>120 gal/day Poor You use a lot of water
Water Resources Average Daily Water Use

Daily indoor per capita water use in the typical single family home is 69.3 gallons. Here is how it breaks down:

UseGallons per CapitaPercentage of Total Daily Use
Showers11.616.8%
Clothes Washers15.021.7%
Dishwashers1.01.4%
Toilets18.526.7%
Baths1.21.7%
Leaks9.513.7%
Faucets10.915.7%
Other Domestic Uses1.62.2%

Source: AWWA

Water Resources Home Water Conservation
Water Savings
The amount of savings depends on current water consumption habits, water, sewer and energy costs, current flow rates of fixtures and flush volumes of toilets, system pressure, and the amount of water leakage through fittings and toilets. Water can be conserved by making improvements in the home or by modifying behavior.

Retrofit or Replace Water Fixtures
Water-saving devices are economical and permanent. Low-flow showerheads and faucet aerators save valuable water and energy used to heat water without requiring changes in personal water use habits. The following chart highlights how much water can be conserved by installing water-saving equipment in place of conventional plumbing fixtures, fittings and appliances.




Conventional Fixture/Appliance

Water Use (gallons)

Water Saving Fixture/Appliance

Water Use (gallons)

Water Savings (gallons)

Vintage Toilet*

4 - 6 per flush

Low Consumption Toilet***

1.6 per flush

2.4 - 4.4 per flush

Conventional Toilet**

3.5 per flush

Low Consumption Toilet***

1.6 per flush

1.9 gal/flush

Conventional Showerhead*

3-10 per min

Low-Flow Showerhead

2-2.5 per min

0.5 - 8 per min

Faucet Aerator*

3-6 per min

Flow Regulating Aerator

0.5-2.5 per min.

0.5- 5.5 per min

Top-Loading Washer

40-55 per load

Front-Loading Washer

22-25 per load

15 - 33 per load

* Manufactured before 1978
** Manufactured from 1978 to 1993
*** Manufactured since January 1, 1994



Repair All Leaks
A dripping faucet is more than annoying...it is expensive. Even small leaks can waste significant amounts of water. Hot water leaks are a waste of water and of the energy used to heat the water. Leaks inside the toilet can waste up to 200 gallons of water a day. Toilet leaks can be detected by adding a few drops of food coloring to water in the toilet tank. If the colored water appears in the bowl, the toilet is leaking. If you have a leaking faucet or toilet, stop pouring money down the drain and repair it.

How To Save Water In The Bathroom
  • When constructing a new home or remodeling your bathroom, install low consumption (1.6 gal/flush) toilets.
  • Place a weighted plastic one-half gallon jug or a toilet dam in the tanks of conventional toilets to displace and save water with each flush.
  • Install low-flow aerators and showerheads. They are inexpensive, easy to install, and save water and energy.
  • Do not let the faucet flow while brushing your teeth or shaving. Use a glass of water for rinsing teeth.
  • Take showers instead of tub baths. Consider bathing small children together.
  • If your shower has a single-handle control or shut off valve, turn off the flow while soaping or shampooing.
  • Leaking diverter valves (valves which divert water from the tub spout to the showerhead) should be replaced.
How To Save Water In The Kitchen And Laundry Room
  • Refrigerate a pitcher of drinking water instead of letting a faucet flow until the water is cold enough to drink.
  • Use a dishpan or plug the sink for washing and rinsing dishes. Install a low-flow aerator on all faucets.
  • Do not pre-rinse dishes prior to loading in a dishwasher. Prerinsing is an unnecessary and wasteful use of water.
  • Operate the washing machine and dishwasher only when they are fully loaded.
  • Use the proper water level or load size selection on the washing machine.
  • When purchasing a washing machine or dishwasher, consider water consumption as well as energy efficiency. Most manufacturers now provide this information to consumers.
How To Save Water Outside The Home
Watering of lawns and gardens can double normal household water use during the hot, dry summer months. At standard household water pressures, a garden hose will discharge up to 10 gallons of water per minute. To apply an inch of water to 1,000 square feet of lawn or garden requires close to 1,000 gallons of water.

Watering should be limited to gardens, and newly planted lawns and landscaped areas. Established lawns and landscape plantings will usually survive without watering. Inadequate watering encourages shallow root growth and increases the risk of mortality. When water is scarce, your community or individual water supply should be reserved for your most essential needs.
  • Equip your hose with an automatic shut-off nozzle.
  • Use a broom, not a hose, to clean driveways, steps and sidewalks.
  • Water your garden during the coolest part of the day. Do not water on windy days.
  • Use mulch around shrubs and garden plants to reduce evaporation from the soil surface and cut down on weed growth.
Tips for the Home Gardener for Efficient Water Use

Water infrequently, deeply, and thoroughly. This will encourage rooting and greater tolerance to dry spells. Plants send out extra roots in dry conditions to seek water. Plants often bloom more profusely when stressed, as the natural instinct to reproduce creates more flowers.

Water responsibly, using correct watering techniques. Water early in the day, especially as the weather warms, to reduce evaporation loss. Water less often for longer lengths of time to encourage deep root growth. Be sure your irrigation system is in proper working condition. If drip irrigation won’t work for you, try a hand held hose rather than a sprinkler.

Properly condition your soil. Water does not easily penetrate clay soils and water passes too quickly beyond the root zone of plants in sandy soil. Adding organic matter to clay and sandy soils will increase the penetrability of clay soils and the water holding capacity of sandy soils. Claybreaker and Ultra-light soil amendments are suggested for proper conditioning.

Mulch soil surface. Mulching cuts down on water loss due to evaporation. A two-inch layer of mulch or compost is recommended. Apply mulches to shrubs, trees, annuals, vegetable gardens, and even containers.

Shelter container plants. To conserve water, move containers to areas with partial shade to keep them from drying quickly in hot windy areas.

Install a drip or other water conserving irrigation system. Slow drip and deep root watering systems can save up to 60% of all water used in garden care. Professionally installed and maintained irrigation systems will further help conserve water.

Discourage water competition from weeds. Keep weeds pulled and reduce the likelihood of them returning by mulching. Consider using landscape fabric between the soil and your mulch to further reduce weeds.

Water Resources Water News
drought news in California Conservation Center
The following news articles are provided by the Google News service and do not reflect the views or imply an endorsement by the California Conservation Center and its affiliates. We cannot guarantee the relevance of the content of this page or any links that may be followed from the articles herein.
Google News

Reuters

Crews battle 11 major California wildfires amid drought, heat wave
Reuters
LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Crews battled nearly a dozen major wildfires across California on Monday that have forced hundreds of people to flee, destroyed dozens of homes and structures and charred thousands of acres of forest land left bone dry by the ...
Hundreds evacuate as fires spread across drought-hit CaliforniaTelegraph.co.uk
California Firefighters Fighting More Than Fire out WestNBCNews.com
Hundreds Flee as California Wildfires Spread Across Drought-Stricken StateChinatopix

all 1,180 news articles »



Guardian Liberty Voice

California Nudists Stealing Water During Drought?
Guardian Liberty Voice
The owners of a Northern California nudist resort called the Lupin Lodge have been accused of stealing water – a precious commodity now that California is in its third straight year of a historic severe drought. The lodge is located off Aldercroft ...
California nudist camp accused of stealing water during historic droughtNew York Daily News
Drought-plagued California nudists accused of stealing water for skinny dippingTelegraph.co.uk
Water War Between Nudist Colony, Open Space District in Los GatosBreitbart News

all 97 news articles »



Politico

California drought threatens sushi, too
Politico
Sushi eaters could face sticker shock the next time they order a California roll or check the box for another round of yellowtail nigiri. Thanks to the historic drought in California, prices may spike for the specialty rice used in the popular Japanese ...

and more »



Water agencies are learning pools aren't a big factor during drought
Los Angeles Times
As California's drought worsens, swimming pools have become a target for those who think the classic backyard oasis wastes water. Some water districts have prohibited new pools from being filled and have limited how much water existing pools can use.

and more »



California Drought: 'Pop-up' wetlands provide bird habitat
LA Daily News
In this photo taken Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014, a White-faced Ibis forages for food in a rice field near Knights Landing, Calif. Due to the severe drought California's critical wetlands has been cut to as little as one-sixth, threatening the habitat of ...




Christian Science Monitor

Boles Fire roars through Weed, burning homes, forcing evacuations
SFGate
Buckley said the native fuels adapted over thousands of years to the lightning-caused fires that regularly broke out in California. The most problematic in a drought situation, he said, are manzanita, younger ponderosa pine trees and incense cedars ...
Northern California wildfire forces mass evacuationCBS News
Hundreds flee as 11 wildfires blaze across CaliforniaChristian Science Monitor
Northern California Wildfire Burns 100 HomesABC News

all 89 news articles »



California water witches see big business as the drought drags on
The Guardian
As California rounds the corner towards a four-year historic drought, many farmers and vintners have become completely reliant on groundwater. After divvying surface water allotments to satisfy urban, ecosystem and industrial needs, farmers in many ...




SFGate

California drought: Dramatic before-and-after photos
SFGate
California is in a historic three-year drought, and recent photos taken in Northern California put a visual exclamation mark on the issue. The images were captured in August by Justin Sullivan of Getty Images, in the same locations at Lake Oroville and ...




NBCNews.com

California Drought Could Claim Quarter of Rice Crop
NBCNews.com
California's ongoing drought is claiming another victim: the state's rice crop. Nearly 25 percent of California's $5 billion rice crop will be lost this year due to lack of water, say experts. And while analysts say the loss is not a crisis just yet ...
California rice farmer: Drought may make us 'quit'Yahoo News

all 5 news articles »



Wall Street Journal

California drought: Statewide water use drops
San Jose Mercury News
Deep into the third year of a historic drought, Californians are finally starting to take water conservation seriously. Statewide, urban residents cut water use 7.5 percent in July, compared with July of last year, according to new figures released ...
California drought: Residents use less water, but is that enough? (+video)Christian Science Monitor
As Agriculture Swoons in Drought, West Coast Firms Avoid Worst EffectsWall Street Journal
California communities still thirsting for drought help from CongressMiamiHerald.com
Los Angeles Times -Chico Enterprise-Record -Motley Fool
all 151 news articles »

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