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California's Wildlife Wildlife and Habitat Management in California
California Valley QuailCalifornia's varied topography and climate supports a large diversity of habitats, plant, and animal species. California has more species than any other state in the United States and also has the greatest number of endemic species, those that occur nowhere else in the world.

The state’s diverse natural communities provide a wide variety of habitat conditions for wildlife. The state’s wildlife species include:

84 species of reptiles (30 percent of the total number found in the United States)
51 species of amphibians (22 percent of U.S. species)
67 species of freshwater fish (8 percent of U.S. species)
433 species of birds (47 percent of U.S. species)
197 mammal species (47 percent of U.S. species)

Seventeen species of mammals, 17 species of amphibians, and 20 species of freshwater fish live here and nowhere else.

State and Federally Listed Endangered and Threatened Animals of California

Download the full list

California's Wildlife Fully Protected Animals in California
In the 1960's the state made an initial effort to classify species as "Fully Protected" and provide additional protection to those animals that were rare or faced possible extinction. Lists were created for fish, mammals. amphibians and reptiles, birds and mammals. Please note that most fully protected species have also been listed as threatened or endangered species under the more recent endangered species laws and regulations. View the Lists on the CA Fish and Game site
California's Wildlife Species Mapping Resources
The California Fish and Game Department is serving up on-line GIS mapping resources that will ena-ble you to view species ranges, occourances, and habitats.

The California Natural Diversity Database Quick Viewer tool provides you with a list of all CNDDB elements (species or natural communities) that have been documented by the CNDDB to occur on the selected USGS 7.5' topographic quad.

Check out California herps, an illustrated atlas that documents the diverse reptile and amphibian fauna found in California.
California Snakes
California Lizards
California Turtles
California Frogs
California Salamanders

California's Wildlife California Wildlife Habitat Relationships System
The life history accounts and range maps represent updated versions of the species information found in the three-volume set "California's Wildlife" edited by Zeiner, D.C. et al 1988-1990. There are also accounts for 48 more species here than in the original publication, bringing the total up to 694. The information was prepared under contract with the best available experts for various taxonomic groups.
Check out the Life History Accounts and Range Maps

California's Wildlife The Wildlife Species Matrix
The Matrix provides the ability to query for species listings by species status, taxonomic group, habitat type and geographic region. Using these elements provided below, viewers can create informative queries by combining multiple selection criteria.
Go to the Matrix

California's Wildlife Species & Vegetation - Species Explorer
With the Species Explorer you can search for or browse species from the highest level categories to all the way down to specific organisms.
Browse species from the highest level categories to the specific taxon or taxon subgroup.
Search species by entering in search terms and optionally limiting your search to a particular broad category of species or those species that are associated with a particular application.

California's Wildlife Best Management Practice Downloads
Whether you grow tomatoes, irrigate rice, sell sod, raise cattle, tend orchards, own forest, cut timber, run a hunt club or feed wildlife, in some way you manage habitat. “Best management practices” (BMPs) are available to assist landowners with planning, implementing and managing their land.

Developed by experienced practitioners, and management and research organizations, these management tools are based on the best available science. BMPs will often save landowners money in the long term even as they improve conditions for wildlife in the short term.

The following are a selection of BMPs culled from various national, regional, state and local sources. Each is available for download as a pdf.
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Review of the available literature on the ecological and economic impact of ecosystem services provided by  bats. Read More »


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Here, using publicly available information, the Marine Conservation Institute and Mission Blue present the first scientifically rigorous quantitative account of no-take marine reserves in the waters of US coastal states and territories.

All people depend on services and goods that living oceans provide, but human activities now threaten marine life and, hence, our lives. Marine biologists recommend creating strong marine protected areas (MPAs) to safeguard life within them and to benefit people outside them. Many coastal states and territories have established at least some protected areas, but this protection is often weak or temporary, with fewer benefits to people. In contrast, no-take marine reserves—MPAs free from fishing, mining and oil & gas development—are the gold standard. They allow places in the sea to recover biodiversity and abundance, and export marine life to surrounding and remote areas.

Our finding: Few states provide strong protection for marine ecosystems. There is much room for improvement.

The best-protected states and territories are Hawaii, California and the US Virgin Islands. Hawaii protects 22.94% of its state marine waters as no-take reserves; California 8.74% and USVI 5.69%. These states and territories deserve our appreciation and our business. A few protect very small amounts of their coastal waters, roughly 1% or less (Florida, Puerto Rico, Oregon, CNMI, Guam, Washington, North Carolina, Virginia and Maine). Fifteen coastal states, including Alaska, Mississippi, South Carolina, Delaware and Massachusetts, don’t yet strongly protect any of their marine waters. Citizens deserve to know which states are leaders and which aren’t doing enough to protect our beaches, coastal waters and seafood. Read More »


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The Montna farming family of Dingville, Calif., successfully integrates commercial rice production on its 3,000 acres of land with habitat enhancement practices which benefits waterbirds, thanks to a partnership with California's NRCS. Read More »


American Bird Conservancy (ABC), in cooperation with the American Forest Foundation, Forest Restoration Partnership, and several other partners, is working with private landowners to implement bird conservation  measures in ponderosa pine habitat throughout the western United States. Our partnership seeks to help family forest owners restore open, mature stands of ponderosa pine habitat to meet the needs of cavity- nesting bird species of conservation concern, nota- bly the Flammulated Owl, Lewis’s Woodpecker, and White-headed Woodpecker.


We have been working with landowners on large and small tracts of ponderosa pine forest to encourage the implementation of ponderosa pine restoration and conservation measures such as thinning, fuels reduction, and snag management. Our program also includes activities such as the preparation of management plans, field demonstration days hosted by private landowners, development of education and outreach materials, initiation of nest box programs, and the collection of inventory and monitoring data that describe habitat conditions and assess the presence and habitat suitability for priority bird species.

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From The Heinz Center, this 2008 lengthy publication is targeted to land managers who practice adaptive management.

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A Prescribed Fire Association is a group of landowners and other concerned citizens that form a partnership to conduct prescribed burns. Prescribed burning is the key land management tool used to restore and maintain native plant communities to their former diversity and productivity for livestock production and wildlife habitat. Native prairies, shrublands, and forests supply the majority of livestock forage and much of the wildlife habitat in the U.S. Without fire, many native plant communities become dysfunctional and unproductive. Research has clearly shown that there is no substitute for fire. 

Many forest and grassland ecosystems are fire dependent and not burning is poor land management.  Why do not more people use prescribed fire to manage their land? First, fire was not part of the European culture that settled in post-Columbian America. Fire exclusion and fire suppression has been engrained in our society for years and popularized by the very successful Smokey the Bear ad campaign. The result has been a rapid decline in the quality of our natural resources, along with costing taxpayers millions of dollars each year to fight wildfires and the many other negative consequences of fuel build up. This article has been adapted from Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Association. Read More »


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Guide provides an approved design for wildlife escape ladders in watering facilities.

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Watering tanks installed for livestock are often used by wildlife as well, with unintended consequences. Sage-grouse are known to drown in livestock water tanks that do not have escape ramps.
 

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Landowners share their experiences of managing for bird species and other wildlife values on their lands throughout the West, including ponderosa pine, the Oregon outback and forests of the Pacific Northwest.

 
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The Center for Irrigation Technology has published an exhaustive  Landowner's Manual for Managing Agricultural Irrigation Drainage Water, A guide for developing Integrated On-Farm Drainage Management Systems.

Each chapter has been published separately, and can be found at http://cit.cati.csufresno.edu/DrainageManual/
or downloaded at privatelandownernetwork.org or stateconservation.org/california - search IFDM.
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The mission of Western Grassland Initiative is to serve as the primary contributor to the implementation of conservation and management actions, through partnerships and cooperative efforts, resulting in improved species status, grassland habitats, and recreational opportunities for grassland dependent species across North America.

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BMPs oriented more specifically toward water quality, farming & agriculture, energy efficiency and invasive & native species are also available on this site.

Learn more about Wildlife Conservation Learn more about Wildlife Conservation


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As fire seasons have tended to become longer and fire behavior more severe, questions inevitably arise among the public and media. “Is this the worst fire season ever?” “How does this year compare with otherbad fire seasons?”

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Policy Resolution 13-04: Western Governors direct the Western Governors’ Wildlife Council to continue its guidance in the development, management and implementation with partners of the state and West-wide CHATs. Western Governors also urge federal agencies to use state fish and wildlife data and analyses as principal sources to inform their land use, land planning and related natural resource decisions, rather than spending scarce resources duplicating existing state data collection efforts.

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List includes native and introduced species. Read More »


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Castle Rock is an island on the outer coast of Del Norte County, California, and is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) Complex. Report is a synthesis of information for development of a Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP). Read More »


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California’s wild turkeys  occupy about 18 percent of the state, and are a highly valued upland game bird. Brochure summarizes management and control of wild turkeys. Read More »


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"Coyote country" information and precautions. Read More »


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This booklet describes techniques to minimize landscape damage due to deer without harming deer and other wildlife. These include: 
  • landscape with deer resistant plants;
  • apply commercial deer repellents;  and
  • construct deer-proof fencing.
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More than half of California is mountain lion habitat. Mountain lions occur wherever deer, their primary prey, are found. They are a Specially Protected Mammal in California and cannot be hunted. Read More »


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Bear country precautions for campers Read More »


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Bear country precautions for homeowners. Read More »


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2011/2012 Waterfowl Hunting Information (Including Map and FAQ) Read More »


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Children's book explaining the importance of invasive weeds.  Developed for the Los Angeles Weed Management Area. Read More »


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The large uncertainty surrounding the future effects of sea-level rise and other aspects of climate change on tidal marsh ecosystems exacerbates the difficulty in planning effective conservation and restoration actions. We addressed these difficulties in the context of large-scale wetland restoration activities underway in the San Francisco Estuary (Suisun, San Pablo and San Francisco Bays).

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A Bird Trail is more than a trail in the literal sense.  It is a “necklace” of sites, usually linked by a physiographic feature such as a river, that are united by the theme of “great for bird watching!”  Birding Trails are essentially driving routes that help you get from one prime birding spot to the next.  

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The term “early successional habitat” describes the shrubs, trees, and other plants that grow back on the land after older vegetation has been removed or cut back. We can visualize this important habitat type as all the stages of plant growth from open grasslands to young forest. Historically, these habitats were created by natural disturbances, extreme physical conditions such as poor soils or harsh climates, the abandonment of agricultural land, and logging. In recent years, human development has greatly reduced the amount of land available to wildlife, and many of the disturbances that once gave rise to early successional habitat – fire, extensive areas of flooding caused by beavers, and heavy logging – have been suppressed (Trani et al. 2001). As a result, populations of wildlife that need early successional habitat have fallen drastically (Litvaitis, 1993; Thompson & Dessecker, 1997).

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The purpose of this document is to help anyone who is a steward of sagebrush shrublands include management practices that help support a thriving community of wild birds. The recommendations are entirely voluntary.
 

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The invasion of juniper and other conifers into sagebrush rangelands degrades habitat for sage grouse. The most effective approach is to target early encroachment stands, completely removing small trees, and thereby sustaining the existing sagebrush community.

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Guide provides an approved design for wildlife escape ladders in watering facilities.

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Watering tanks installed for livestock are often used by wildlife as well, with unintended consequences. Sage-grouse are known to drown in livestock water tanks that do not have escape ramps.
 

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This primer displays the historic and current range of sage-grouse, sage-grouse management zones, and the breeding bird density map.

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Fish and Wildlife Service’s March 2010 status review provides a detailed description of seasonal habitats, sage-grouse natural history and population trend analyses.

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Introductory guide provides key points for a basic understanding of the greater sage-grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus and  its habitats.

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This factsheet gives specific guidelines for amounts, types and frequency of fish to be eaten for safeguarding health. Read More »



Methylmercury is a form of mercury that is found in most freshwater and saltwater fish. In some lakes, rivers, and coastal waters in California, methylmercury has been found in some types of fish at concentrations that may be harmful to human health. The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) has issued health advisories to fishers and their families giving recommendations on how much of the affected fish in these areas can be safely eaten. In these advisories, women of childbearing age and children are encouraged to be especially careful about following the advice because of the greater sensitivity of fetuses and children to methylmercury. 

Fish are nutritious and should be a part of a healthy, balanced diet. As with many other kinds of food, however, it is prudent to consume fish in moderation. OEHHA provides advice to the public so that people can continue to eat fish without putting their health at risk.
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The first U.S. market for forest carbon offset projects implemented anywhere in the U.S. will open in 2012.  The state of California, as in so many things, is poised for a for a first. Under its Global Warming Solutions Act, known as AB32, the Golden State will establish the nation’s first compliance carbon market to allow forest carbon offsets. California’s carbon market, which opened in January 2012, will be the second largest in the world, after the European Union, and the largest in North America. New England’s Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI, is currently North America’s only compliance market for carbon emissions but does not allow forest carbon offsets.

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The mission of Western Grassland Initiative is to serve as the primary contributor to the implementation of conservation and management actions, through partnerships and cooperative efforts, resulting in improved species status, grassland habitats, and recreational opportunities for grassland dependent species across North America.

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Through Working Lands for Wildlife —a voluntary, incentive-based effort—the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and its conservation partners will provide landowners with technical and financial assistance to: Restore populations of declining wildlife species. provide farmers, ranchers, and forest managers with regulatory certainty that conservation investments they make today help sustain their operations over the long term, and strengthen and sustain rural economies by restoring and protecting the productive capacity of working lands. Read more about the different focal species here.

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California's Wildlife California Wildlife Action Plan
The California State Wildlife Action Plan California Wildlife: Conservation Challenges, was developed in consultation with wildlife professionals, stakeholders, and the public, focuses the stresses affecting wildlife and the additional actions needed to maintain its diversity and abundance in the future. Download the full report here (large 18 MB PDF file). Or you can access individual chapters by clicking the sections below and selecting a chapter
California's Wildlife California Wildlife Areas & Reserves
The Department of Fish and Game manages over 700 state owned properties throughout California. These properties represent every major ecosystem in the state providing habitat for a rich diversity of fish, wildlife, and plant species. The Lands Program is responsible for managing California's wildlife areas and ecological reserves.
California's Wildlife California Bioregions
Bioregions Map
Due to the diversity of California’s landscapes, the state has classified ten land-based bioregions, areas of California with similar physical, biological, and cultural features. The boundaries were identified in 1988 as a product of long deliberations among members of the state’s Interagency Natural Areas Coordinating Committee. They were later adopted by the California Biodiversity Council, formed in 1991 to improve coordination and cooperation amongst 38 federal, state and local agencies and organizations involved with resource management and protection.

By following nature’s boundaries, with due attention to socio-political elements, the coordination of conservation strategies on all levels can be improved. The bioregional approach helps to educate and encourage the participation of landowners, businesses, civic leaders, environmentalists, academics, and others in local conservation efforts and planning. Listed in the following bioregional sections are examples of conservation initiatives which generally follow three basic tenants essential to solutions on any scale: 1) inclusive partnerships, 2) private sector engagement, and 3) management of ecosystems.

Many of the state’s bioregions face similar threats due to increasing population growth and urban development. How this affects each region depends on the complex make-up of physical, social, economic, and natural features of that region. No two regions are alike and solutions to regional problems are rarely the same. Though there are regional similarities, the underlying site-specific solution is as unique as the people who inhabit each region.

Interestingly, today’s bioregional boundaries are in close alignment with the state’s natural settlement patterns dating to the mid-19th century, long before urban development projects had obscured the direct convergence between human activities and the natural order. Early settlers, heavily dependent on water sources, sustainable forests and fisheries and on subsistence agriculture, showed great respect for natural systems and lived and worked within their contours. It is our hope that the bioregional perspective will assist today’s communities to this same end.

Bay / Delta Colorado Desert Modoc Mojave Klamath / North Coast Sacramento Valley San Joaquin Valley Sierra Central Coast South Coast Modoc Bay / Delta Klamath / North Coast Sacramento Valley Sierra San Joaquin Valley Central Coast Colorado Desert South Coast Mojave
Wildlife News in California
wildlife+conservation news in California Conservation Center
The following news articles are provided by the Google News service and do not reflect the views or imply an endorsement by the California Conservation Center and its affiliates. We cannot guarantee the relevance of the content of this page or any links that may be followed from the articles herein.
Google News

Balancing Renewable Energy Development and Conservation in CA Desert
Public News Service
The Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan is a joint federal and state effort to identify locations suitable for renewable energy development while conserving areas important for wildlife, wilderness and recreation, said Kim Delfino, California ...
Desert plan needs your inputVictorville Daily Press

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California's Renewable Energy Plan Misses the Point on Renewable Energy
KCET
The plan, commonly referred to as the DRECP, would shape both renewable energy development and some conservation across 22 million acres of the California desert in six counties. ... is 14 pages long, amounting to 5,991 words including footnotes, and ...




These California spiny lobsters are popular in China and that has ...
LA Daily News
The nocturnal animal wanted to be returned to the black nighttime ocean, where it had ventured out of a cave perhaps in search of sea urchins or mussels to eat along the giant, sloping rocks that form the Los Angeles Harbor breakwall. But Romanowski ...

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Possible Lawsuit Over Pinto Abalone Protection
Santa Barbara Independent
The pinto abalone, a red- and green-shelled abalone found primarily amidst the kelp-forested coasts of British Columbia and Alaska but with populations reaching as far south as Baja California, was never the most widely represented of abalones in Santa ...

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TBO.com

Body pulled from channel near downtown Tampa
TBO.com
The sheriff's office, Tampa Police Department, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the U.S. Coast Guard worked together to find the man. The man appeared to have jumped into the water near the convention center and the Platt ...

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E! Online

One Direction Releases "Steal My Girl" Music Video, Tells PETA No Animals ...
E! Online
"We vetted Steve Martin closely and chose him based on his exemplary treatment of animals, his highly regarded 'reward based' training, and his history in contributing to animal conservation educational programs." ... such as The Bourne Legacy, True ...

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Paddle race to be featured at film festival ~ Nov. 1
Red Bluff Daily News
... the kind of intergenerational land stewardship depicted in several of the films. The Northern California Regional Land Trust has been instrumental in conserving valuable farm lands, open spaces, and wildlife habitat in Tehama, Glenn and Butte County.

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Places to Go
Highlands Today
... Forest Service in northern California. Moving to Lake Placid in 1986, he worked for Archbold Biological Station and MacArthur Agro-ecology Research Station. He served as a biological scientist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation ...

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Newsweek

Jane Goodall's Jungles
Newsweek
And the discoveries Goodall made—redefining our understanding of chimpanzees and, in doing so, upending long-held beliefs about humans and the rest of the animal kingdom—catapulted her to international fame. She is arguably the most famous female ...




Photos: Amazing Shots from 'Wildlife Photographer of the Year' Contest
Live Science
A striking black-and-white photo of lions took first prize at the 50th Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, but an international panel of judges honored a handful of other gifted artists of all ages. The Natural History Museum in London will ...

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